Latest articles from Saskatchewan Perennial Society

Dwarf Sour Cherries: Enter ‘D’Artagnan’

Sara WilliamsSaskatchewan Perennial SocietyAlso called pie cherries, these are most often used in cooking and processing. Traditionally, Canadians call them “sour” while Americans call...

How to prevent powdery mildew disease from taking over

Jill ThomsonSaskatchewan Perennial SocietyThis growing season, there seem to be many plants affected by mildew early in the season, particularly in my shady front...

Hardy Clematis that flourish on the Prairies

Sara WilliamsSaskatchewan Perennial SocietyClematis (from the Greek word for vine) are among our most beautiful vines. While many do very well on the Prairies...

Don’t let slugs force you to sell your house!

Erl SvendsenSaskatchewan Perennial Society I joke that I sold my last house because I found myself sharing the garden with a multitude of slimy slugs....

Pines for the Prairies: Mugo pine

Mugo pine (Pinus mugo) is native to the mountains of southern and eastern Europe, from Spain to the Balkans. The species name, mugo, is...

Beets: easy to grow and tasty

Sara Williams and Jackie BantleSaskatchewan Perennial SocietyIf you haven’t seeded your beets in the garden, it’s not too late. Beets (Beta vulgaris) are one...

Be a Popeye and eat your spinach!

Saskatchewan Perennial SocietyPopeye the sailor man, invented by Elzie Crisler Segar, first appeared as a comic strip character in 1929. By 1932, Popeye was...

Arbor Week – Plant a tree or two or three or more

Sara Williams I’ve been planting small trees every spring for almost half a century. At one time, hundreds; more recently, only a few. But the...

Pines for the Prairies [Part III]

The following pines are all native to North America. And with a little bit of care, all have been successfully grown on the prairies....

ASPARAGUS – A PERENNIAL VEGETABLE WORTH THE WAIT

Jackie Bantle and Sara WilliamsSaskatchewan Perennial Society Asparagus (Asparagus officinalis) is a perennial vegetable that is easily grown on the Prairies despite being native to...

Plant Sunflowers – In solidarity and hope for peace

Sara WilliamsSaskatchewan Perennial Society This is the first time I have ever written a gardening article with political overtones. I visited Ukraine about 10 years...

Keeping Dutch Elm Disease under control

Jill Thomson Saskatchewan Perennial Society Dutch Elm Disease (DED) has been with us for many years. It is thought to have originated in Southeast Asia, travelled...

Pine for the Prairies – Part 2

Sara Williams Saskatchewan Perennial Society Scots pine and Swiss stone pine are from Europe but have grown well here for generations. It’s always a horticultural high...

Learning and Giving Back: The University of Saskatchewan Master Gardener Program

Sara WilliamsSaskatchewan Perennial Society As “pandemic fatigue” seems to drag on and on, we look for the positive to brighten our world. In the world...

Pines for the prairies [Part I]

Sara Williams Saskatchewan Perennial Society Pines are found world-wide, mostly in the Northern Hemisphere. Pinus is the classical Latin name for this genus. Many pines, both...

Information at your fingertips: www.gardening.usask.ca!

Sara Williams Saskatchewan Perennial Society When the Department of Horticulture of the University of Saskatchewan was created in 1921, one of its major responsibilities, along with...

What does your Tussie-Mussie have to say?

By Ginnie Hartley Floriography – isn’t that a gorgeous word? It means the language of flowers. People have attributed meaning to flowers for thousands of...

Dieter Martin, the man about campus

Bernadette Vangool Saskatchewan Perennial Society A friend of mine was recently invited to a birthday party in honour of Dieter Martin who is ninety years young....

Is It Time to Replace my Garden Seeds?

Jackie Bantle - Saskatchewan Perennial Society In the deep, dark cold of winter, gardening season seems like a distant memory or wishful thinking.  I have...

What is full sun?

By Bernadette Vangool - Saskatchewan Perennial Society 'On a given day, only the uppermost leaves on the tallest trees enjoy the luxury of direct sunlight...

Holiday Cactus: Care and Keeping (Part II)

by Sara WilliamsSaskatchewan Perennial Society Christmas cactus, Thanksgiving cactus and Easter cactus have added joy to our homes for over two centuries, since they were...

The Story of our Holiday cactus: part 1

by Sara WilliamsSaskatchewan Perennial Society Easy to care for, long-lived (40 years is not unusual) and relatively inexpensive, holiday cacti are popular flowering houseplants. They...

All I want for Christmas is… Part 2

By Bernadette Vangool - Saskatchewan Perennial Society As the person who fields emails for the Saskatchewan Perennial Society, I'm often approached with a...

All I want for Christmas is…

By Bernadette Vangool As I was perusing my bookshelf, I thought I would share with you the many book gift possibilities for you, your resident...

Garden Soil, Part II. Top Soil and Soil Amendments

By Sara Williams - Saskatchewan Perennial Society Once you’ve tilled your existing soil to a minimum depth of 15 cm (6 in.) (more is better),...

Garden soil part I: know what you have before you plant

by Sara WilliamsSaskatchewan Perennial Society If you’ve recently purchased a new home, you’re probably anxious to begin landscaping. But before planting, check out your soil....

A visit to a spring garden

by Bernadette VangoolSaskatchewan Perennial Society I visited Keukenhof in 2012 as part of a garden tour to Holland and Belgium. It was the highlight of...

Jerusalem Artichoke: A Fall Planted Root Vegetable

by Jackie BantleSaskatchewan Perennial Society When most of us think of artichokes, we think of the green scaley immature flower buds that can be found...

Fall Harvest: Onions and Potatoes

by Jackie BantleSaskatchewan Perennial Society Although you may have been harvesting onions and potatoes since summer, fall is the time to harvest these two crops...

Peonies; divide and conquer

by Sara WilliamsSaskatchewan Perennial Society Peonies have adorned our prairie farmsteads for over a century. They are well-behaved, long lived (sixty years in not unusual),...