Inaugural Winter Festival event celebrated young talent

One of the Prince Albert Winter Festival’s newest shows proved Sunday that youth can do it too.

The first (and annual, organizers hope) youth extravaganza was exactly that — a two-hour show featuring multi-talented youth from Prince Albert and beyond.

It showed off singers, dancers, fiddlers and other musicians in a show where youth introduced the acts, performed and even provided the backing band.

For the show’s producers, Kayleigh Skomorowski and Pam Cochet, it was everything they had hoped it would be.

“I think it was awesome,” Skomorowski said, adding that the kids learned from each other “big time.”

“Backstage it was so cool, because all these kids, some who had never met before, were all intertwined as supporting cast members, helping  each other and practicing.”

They’re especially pleased as the show came together really quickly. They only started work on it just before Christmas.

“The band started right after Christmas break,” Skomorowski said.

That band, consisting of Rilee Mecelborg, Kai Finnestad, Caleb Hammond and Grant Alexander also performed in some of the other acts Sunday night, in addition to providing backing instrumentals and vocals for all of the performers.

“I think the show came together very well,” Cochet said.

‘We had some groups that had to pull out because of other commitments, but I think our show was very well-rounded.”

“We got the variety we wanted,” Skomorowski said.

Even better, the organizers said, was the turnout.

“It was a good turnout,” Skomorowski said.

“And not just grandparents and moms and dads,” Cochet added, “But other people.”

For the two of them, the Youth Extravaganza was a chance to showcase how much talent Prince Albert’s young people have.

“It’s about celebrating the youth, giving them the chance to be on stage. The learning experience was phenomenal,” Cochet said.

The kids learned from the E.A. Rawlinson Staff what goes on behind-the-scenes, as well as from each other about performing in front of a live audience.

“The kids were helping each other when it came time for rehearsal,” Cochet said.

“The more practice they have on stage, the better. It’s not all about taking lessons, it’s about becoming performers.”

Country Comfort – March